The Irishman (2019)

The Irishman (2019)

The IrishmanDirected by: Martin Scorsese. Starring: Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Joe Pesci. Runtime: 3h 29 min. Released: November 27, 2019.

Martin Scorsese brings an all-star cast of Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci to the little screen in Netflix’s The Irishman, a mafia movie that follows Frank Sheeran (De Niro), a mafia hitman who recalls his career and his involvement in the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa (Pacino).

The good in The Irishman are in its performances. De Niro is threatening and such a presence as Sheeran. Pacino plays a great union leader in Hoffa, and he gets most of the angry explosions that Joe Pesci has become known for. Pacino’s also perfect at convincing certain people that he’s nice, as well. Pesci plays Russell Bufalino, the head of the Buffalino crime family. He’s threatening and powerful but stays calm and collected throughout the film, and he’s more threatening for it.

The most interesting part about this for me is Frank’s relationship with his daughter Peggy (played by Anna Paquin when she’s older). Paquin does a great job as the character because while she only has seven words of dialogue, her stares at her father speak a thousand words, and just her general disapproval and suspicion of his involvement in Hoffa’s disappearance. In the scenes when Peggy is a child, we can tell she’s scared of him because of his reputation and just the fact that he curb stomps a dude right in front of her because the man pushed her (De Niro stomping near the guy’s head is the least convincing thing in this film). Frank’s relationship with his daughter was the only time I felt emotionally connected to the film.

That’s not to say that the dialogue is bad or anything, Scorsese writes and directs the film like the master that he is, there just aren’t a lot of moments in this film where I could get emotionally attached to the characters. They’re all criminals, but they’re well-sculpted characters. The mafia action scenes – when Frank would just casually walk up to someone and shoot them in the face – are great. The more complex ones like Frank shooting someone in a restaurant off-screen and then getting into his getaway car is also exciting. The scenes in this film that I loved, I truly loved, as everyone from the starring trio to Ray Romano and Jesse Plemons are well-cast and enjoyable to watch.

The Irishman article
Al Pacino in The Irishman. (IMDb)

The film just literally feels like I took all day watching this. I thought there were more than a few boring stretches in this 209-minute film. I don’t have anything against long movies, but this just feels like it drags. I’d be bored, it would hold my attention for 45 minutes, then I’d be bored again. The crime saga admittedly feels aimless at first as Sheeran recaps his career and it only gets fascinating when Jimmy Hoffa comes in but that’s not until 80 minutes into the story. De Niro’s point of view is a good way to get into this story, but I really feel like the first 80 minutes could have been done in half the time and this would me a much better film at 170 minutes.

It spans different decades and when the stars are younger, the film uses de-aging technology. It’s distracting at first as De Niro’s blue eyes are distracting and Pesci’s head looks too big for his body, and they still walk like old men. As it jumps around through its timeline, it becomes more fluid and less noticeable. That also could be just because it’s three and a half hours and you might forget they’re using de-aging technology. I think The Irishman is a good movie, just not one I’d ever be interested in watching again.

Score: 60/100

X-Men: The Last Stand (2006)

X-Men Last StandReleased: May 26, 2006. Directed by: Brett Ratner. Starring: Hugh Jackman, Famke Janssen, Halle Berry. Runtime: 104 min. 

I guess all mutants getting along was nice when it lasted. This time Charles Xavier’s (Patrick Stewart) X-Men face off against Magneto’s (Ian McKellen) Brotherhood. Stewart’s limited screen time helps prove that a presence will still be felt throughout the flick. In this film, a cure is introduced for mutants everywhere. Is mutation something that really needs to be cured? Do mutants really need to conform to what everyone else looks like? Is it cowardice if they choose to take the cure? This time, it touches on the idea that some mutants might benefit from the cure. This is basically in Rogue, who might benefit from it because if she holds onto someone too long, she could kill them. I learn that she is contributes a lot more in the comic books, when she’s felt sidelined to me in the films – at least in terms of battle. I think that’s awesomely touched on more intelligently with Mystique’s characterization in 2011’s X-Men: First Class.

This film just doesn’t feel as smart as the first two films. Heck, it’s still fun – but there are a lot of frustrating occurrences, mainly because some are so unnecessary. Something this film is missing is Bryan Singer’s direction. He just brought such an intelligent style to it, and it just feels like it’s lacking. This time Brett Ratner directs the film, and it’s a bit of an odd choice. Prior to this he directed the Rush Hour franchise and the Hannibal Lecter flick Red Dragon. It was a cool attempt, but it’s only successful to some avail. The fighting for freedom just feels a bit too clichèd this time around under Ratner’s eye. 

Like the Rush Hour flicks show, his style of direction just feels a bit familiar, and not quite a memorable style you could recognize a single director for. Though, he does direct a phenomenal prison escape sequence and kudos to the cinematography department during it. The actors bring humour to the film, per usual, it just isn’t as strong because the story gets dark at times. The film handles heartbreaking aspects of characterization well to some degree, just not perfectly like the last two films. It does handle being a blockbuster pretty well, though, because this is all really fun. 

It’s cool how Jean is a new sort-of character this time around, found in her alter-ego Phoenix, who is much more aggressive and angry than the regular Jean. Professor X wants to contain it in a series of psychological barriers, while Magneto wants to let her out of her cage. What happens with that is an intense sequence. Janssen gives her most interesting performance of the franchise thus far. In Wolverine and her relationship, Hugh Jackman brings some power to his performance. 

There are some good other mutants. It seems that the Beast, a political representative for mutants, is replacing the blue good guy (Nightcrawler in the last film) this time around. I love Ben Foster as the Angel, even though I would have loved to see more from the character. Callisto (Dania Ramirez) on the villains side is a really cool villain, because she’s like a walking, talking Cerebro. She can sense when mutants are near, and also know their power level. There’s a sort-of porcupine blowfish villain named Kid Omega who’s kind-of fun. He’s portrayed by Ken Leung, and I think I subconsciously assumed he was a villain when I saw him on TV’s Lost because I recognized him from this villainous role. As a villain, Pyro (Aaron Stanford) is a bit of a bland idiot. I thought he was a lot more fun as an antagonizing hero. 

I think the title indicates that there might be a few losses from all ends. I think there’s a minor problem when the opening simulation fighting sequence is the same amount of fun as the finale, but that might be because it’s lacking a few fun characters who would be helpful. The finale should just stand out in memory more, as far as I’m concerned. Don’t get me wrong, I like the finale and I like the film, but it’s just disappointingly not as character-driven as the previous two films.

Score: 65/100

X-Men (2000)

MV5BMTYxMTEzNTgzM15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjg1MzAwMQ@@._V1_SY317_CR11,0,214,317_AL_Released: July 14, 2000. Directed by: Bryan Singer. Starring: Hugh Jackman, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen. Runtime: 104 min.

Bryan Singer brings some great direction to the first film in the X-Men franchise. He directs some action scenes with a great intensity. Opening with a great scene for the character of Magneto (the film’s main antagonist), the film grasps attention from the opening frames with some poignant characterization. The film is set in a world full of mutants, humans with superhuman abilities. The mutant gene is the key to our evolution. A prominent theme in the X-Men films is war.

The war is between the humans and the mutants, because mutants will be met with fear, hostility and aggression. Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) believes that humans and mutants can live together in harmony, while the film’s antagonist, Magneto (Ian McKellen) believes that mutants are the future, and not humans. There are very real themes of discrimination brought about in this film, and I think McKellen can take to the character of Magneto (also known as Erik Leshner) so well because he’s a well-known homosexual advocate, and he can channel his love for the minority (mutants in this case) in his performance. The character is also the perfect mindset to portray that humans are scared of what they don’t understand.

A political character in the film, Senator Kelly (Bruce Davis) believes that mutants should have to register, so they can know who they are. He believes that mutants with dangerous abilities could be weapons, which could be unsettling, especially in a school environment. This is a popcorn flick that also has great characterization and a cool, different way that America was supposed to be a land of tolerance, but is not. I think that’s why I enjoy these X-Men films so much, because they bring real world issues and portray them in such a great and unique narrative. I think it’s cool that young mutants can come to Xavier Academy and experience other people other people with powers, and feel like they’re not alone.

Another way this film is strong is that there are memorable action scenes, and this is only sporadically boring. When the action shows up, it’s great – and the finale is memorable. This film sets the tone for the whole franchise, as most deal with the conflict between humans and mutants (excluding Wolverine’s individual outings). Something else that makes this great is the funny banter between characters and the chemistry between them all. Hugh Jackman’s chemistry with Famke Janssen is good this time around, but I really like the chemistry between Jackman (who portrays Wolverine) and Anna Paquin as Rogue.

Wolverine’s powers is a set of retractable claws made of adamantium (which is also what his exoskeleton is made of), and the ability to heal. I like his character, as he is looking for answers about his past, since he has a sort-of amnesia. He has a great introduction. Rogue has an interesting set of powers – whenever she touches someone, she literally takes the life out of them. This mutation is a bit more unfortunate, and it makes her feel even more segregated. She’s the poster child for mutants who want to feel like they belong. She receives great poignancy and development as a character. It makes her someone who is terrified to hurt those who she loves.

Other characters are great, too. Jean is good, even though I like her characterization better in the first sequel. Storm is great, even though her African accent is kind-of annoying – and it’s funny how she doesn’t use it in the second film. As a villain, I think Sabretooth is pretty good. I don’t think Toad is a good villain. He has three lines, and he’s just useless. The mutation is strange, and he’s just silly – especially when he does a little leprechaun dance approaching Storm, and it seems like he’s trying to be menacing but it’s just awful. Mystique, a mutant who can take the shape of anyone she desires, is one of my favourite villains. She’s portrayed by Rebecca Romijn, which adds a lot of sex appeal to the role. She’s great. Whenever she comes on-screen, there’s a cool little tune in the score. The score, great visual effects and funny banter between the cast makes this a memorable super-hero flick.

Score: 70/100