Filmcraziest Interviews – Terence Krey and Christine Nyland, “An Unquiet Grave”

Filmcraziest Interviews – Terence Krey and Christine Nyland, “An Unquiet Grave”

Welcome to another episode of Filmcraziest Interviews and for this episode I chatted with Terence Krey (writer, director and producer) and Christine Nyland (writer and star, pictured in the featured image) for their new film An Unquiet Grave, which had its World Premiere on Oct. 11 at the Nightstream virtual film festival. The film stars Jacob A. Ware as Jamie, a widow one year removed from the death of his wife. One night, he enlists the help of his sister-in-law Ava (Christine Nyland) to help him bring her back from the dead. It’s a two-actor chamber horror directed by Terence Krey, and written by Krey and Nyland.

Nighstream Film Festival Recap

Nighstream Film Festival Recap

With the first edition of the Nightstream Virtual Film Festival winding down, many of the events are still available on-demand until tomorrow, Oct. 14, and the same can be said for many of the festival’s on-demand titles, too! You can find those tickets and films still available here. I wanted to do a link round-up post for the films I was able to watch at this year’s Nightstream that are still available on demand, as well as some of the same films that are playing at Nightstream that I caught at Fantasia in August, and some of the short films that are playing at this year’s festival, as well, and the ones I’m highlighting will have played at Fantasia.

Nightstream Review: An Unquiet Grave (2020)

Nightstream Review: An Unquiet Grave (2020)

This is another tale in the “what would you do for your family?” horror cannon, which has seen some good features, even at this year’s Nightstream with Anything for Jackson and My Heart Can’t Beat Unless You Tell it To. Here, An Unquiet Grave is carried by two great performances by Jacob A. Ware and Christine Nyland, who also co-writes this film with director Terence Krey. And when I say the film's carried by these two performances, they're virtually the only ones in the film and are there in every scene. With that said, it's great that these performances are so compelling. Ware captures the grief of his character well, as does Nyland, and Nyland’s performance is the standout here as it’s unpredictable, and I would give kudos to a unique aspect of her performance but that would border on spoilers. But with what happens in the film and what results from the ritual is fascinating and creates such a cool dynamic, and makes for such an interesting concept.